Ancient Roman Forum


Roman_Forum

The Ancient Roman Forum was the center of everything important in the Roman empire. This was the main city center where the temples, senate house, law courts and all other important government building sat. This was also the center of public life where the markets and shops were held and where the Roman citizens hosted  celebrations and holiday events . Emperors used the forum to parade their military victories through the main drag, presenting slaves, goods and the king of whatever land they had just conquered. The Forum expanded over time, adding new temples and grand buildings with each great emperor. The forum is next to Palatine Hill, where the palace of the emperors sat and where Rome was originally founded.

The Forum is obviously a main reason to visit Rome and should be at the top of anyone’s list. The Colosseum sits at the end of the forum and the Victor Emmanuel monument on the other, so this spot is the most popular place to tour in Rome. There are 3 parts that are included in the Forum area- the main Forum area, Palatine hill area that sits right next to it, and Trajan’s market that is directly across the street. Each area is easily view able and easy to tour. You could spend a few days here or just a half day depending on how in depth you wanted to go. You can easily walk to the Pantheon, Trevi Fountain and the Spanish Steps from here but I wouldn’t recommend doing it all in one day.

 I find it quite interesting and sad to walk through what used to be the center of this great empire. Over two thousand year old rubble just lays at your feet as you walk the worn flagstones of Rome’s original 2,000-year-old rock forum road. Monuments and temples that were once so enormous, intimidating and important are nothing but broken columns, but the history these columns have seen is mind boggling and it’s truly a remarkable feeling to stand next to them.

Despite what many people think, Julius Caesar was not assassinated at the Senate house in the Forum. The senate was actually meeting in the theater of Pompey in another part of the city the day Cesar was killed. What remains of that building is a small bit of brick and columns that has now been incorporated into the surrounding buildings and is part of the cellars in some of the surrounding restaurants. I was determined to see this spot, even though I knew nothing was really there. It is hard to imagine how things were back in that time when everything around it now completely changed. Caesars body was later burned in the Forum and a memorial spot is present there today.

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The huge arches of the old Law Court turned Basilica

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My husband looking very tiny in comparison!
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Ruins of the Emperors Palace on Palatine Hill

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Trajan’s Market

 

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2 thoughts on “Ancient Roman Forum

  1. johnjchrissy@aol.com

    You said it made you sad to see the buildings and glory gone. It is a perfect example of no matter how powerful or small something is, in the end it’s all equal. The slave in his fear from the powerful Romans, becomes empowered today by the broken and crumbled building, system and government. Wrongs are always made right but not always in your lifetime. It may take a thousand years to correct a wrong but it eventually will happen. All thing change, nothing stays the same, only god remains, to paraphrase what somebody( can’t remember who once wrote). Also, All things must pass, from the Bible I believe. The thing that impressed me most about your pictures are the ones with writing on them. It’s like you can truly see a live person still present in the background. You see the mind and soul through their words. It’s like a ghost.

    Like

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